photo essay

THE NEW METRO STATIONS OF GREEN LINE SOUTH

Metro's Green Line to the South is now complete. It runs out under the Anacostia River, bisecting DC's land East of the Anacostia, out into Prince George's County almost to the Beltway (I95) near (but not directly serving) Andrews Air Force Base. This oddly configured segment is the last of the original plan to be opened and was immediately overwhelmed with commuters coming into the city to work from the more sparsely populated suburbs. At its outset, it will be far more useful to Maryland commuters than to the prosperity of the least successful parts of DC.

The southern reach of the Green Line terminates at Branch Avenue with a large, airy station with large parking lots (upper left and right photos). Coming into DC, the next above-ground station is Suitland, with its nearby federal government facilities; then Naylor Road with its residential areas and modest mall; and then Southern Avenue (lower right photo) just outside the District Line, and sporting several new housing developments. Here the line plunges underground to Congress Heights (lower left photo), a generally poor residential section; and proceeds under the large underutilized government property of St. Elizabeth's Hospital (with no station). The next station is Anacostia--a relatively highly used station (over 10,000 boardings daily)--and then under the river to the Navy Yard Station, about six blocks from the entrance to the Navy Yard, and currently one of the four least utilized stations in DC. This station will be most productive for the new developments planned at and near what was the Southeast Federal Center. Next comes Waterfront, another below-average usage station, with the system's most poorly designed single entrance (in the middle of a parking lot). From there, the line proceeds north to L'Enfant Plaza-- the sixth busiest station in DC, and an exchange station for four lines (Green, Yellow, Blue and Orange)--and then to Archives/Navy Memorial in the downtown area at Pennsylvania Avenue.

The Green Line South is a welcome addition to the Metrorail system, but it is another radial commuter-oriented line that will do little per se for the economic development of DC's struggling communities East of the Anacostia.

Return to Beginning of Essay

This page was updated on Feb 5, 2001


homeissuesstatusanalysesemail
| HOME PAGE | MAJOR ISSUES | CURRENT STATUS | RECENT ANALYSES | SITE MAP | EMAIL |

SEARCH THIS SITE

© copyright 2007 NARPAC, Inc. All rights reserved