RATIONALE FOR REPLACING THE 18TH-CENTURY CONSTITUTION

Constitution
top mobile web builder

Welcome Back to NARPAC, Inc


We are a non-Profit now in our 20th Year – and 4th phase -- of trying to bring attention to the various major issues that jeopardize the future standing and respect of our United States of America. Signs of indifference abound: from the condition of our National Capital City and dysfunctional Congress; to the conduct of our day-to-day political life and the underlying problems of a 240 year old Constitution – ill-equipped to guide us forward in a modern, burgeoning, high tech, competitive world of 196 nations, with 7.4 billion people, in which we are a diminishing brand.  Here is what we have to offer:


#4 USCon A brand new draft for a 21st Century Constitution to Encourage a National Dialogue (2016) 


#3 @narpacdc Irreverent Tweets on Current Political Tomfoolery Regularly Linked to our Increasingly Irrelevant “USCon” (ongoing)


#2 REBOOT An Incomplete Effort to Diagnose Congressional Inactivity, Let's “Reboot” It by Updating the Conscience of Democracy (2013) 


#1 NARPAC DC A 10-year Effort to Improve Global Image of District of Columbia In All Its Many Visible Roles as our National Capital City  

RATIONALE FOR REPLACING THE 18TH CENTURY CONSTITUTION

In the two and a half centuries since our Declaration of Independence, Articles of Confederation, and Constitution of the United States were forged. this country has grown from a fledgling “Union” of 13 sovereign republics, to a single, fully unified, fully functional, democratic nation of 50 states in a World totally unimaginable at its conception. It is now fitting and appropriate that We, The People of the United States of America, do now ordain and adopt a revised 21st Century Constitution properly reflecting current national and global realities and future outlooks. Our objectives remain to pursue: a more perfect union; assure Justice, domestic tranquility, general welfare, national security; and to preserve the blessings of liberty while exercising both the appropriate duties of a functional Democracy, and the global obligations of a leading World power. It is inconceivable that a constitution fashioned in the 18th Century among refugees from an oppressive--and distant--monarchy would create a document that would successfully survive twenty-some generations of interrelated political, social, demographic, technological, governmental, and environmental metamorphoses. It is, in fact, remarkable that the extant document provides the basis and stimulus for this major revision. Since our existing Constitution was signed, the United States has grown enormously in size, population, and global influence. Land area has grown fourfold, along with number of States, and US population has increased 86-fold (while global population has risen 8-fold).

At the same time, the US has morphed from 90% "rural" to 80% "urban", and 40% of all Americans will soon live in 20 "modern metropolitan areas" on just 4% of US land -- in 17 of our 50 States. 55% of all Americans live in the 10 most populous states; 3% in the 10 least populated. More than 90 US counties have larger populations than the District of Columbia, perennially seeking Statehood. The question of "equal (or even appropriate) representation" in the Congress cannot be avoided. Equally noteworthy, the number of US Federal (2.7+M) and State (19.2M+) Government Workers is approaching six times the total US population in 1790, and the vast majority of Federal employees (99%) work for the Constitutionally-distrusted Executive Branch. Stature-wise, with only 4% of the World's population, the US Gross Domestic Product now accounts for a full 25% of the total among the World's current 190 nations--and is 60% larger than that of the runner-up, the World's most populous nation, China. In fact, US GDP exceeds that of the 175 smallest nations combined. And despite an empty Constitutional prohibition against maintaining a standing army--allowing only a militia and navy--the US also now accounts for over 38% of the World's total military expenditures, as much as the next 12 nations combined. The gradual transition from "republic" to "democracy" has not been codified in the modernization of our Constitution, from our National Anthem to our Pledge of Allegiance, and Oath of Office. Perhaps most poignant are the frequent popular references to quotations from President Lincoln's Gettysburg Address--which for all intents and purposes "amended" our Constitution in spirit if not in fact. We still have not realized “one voter, one vote” in either primary or presidential elections, nor have we reached “equal pay for equal work” even among senior Federal workers and members of Congress. It is high time to catch up with the implicit changes in our creed in the 150 years since then.

Copyright ©2016 Narpac, Inc.